Summer Jobs

A lot of high school students want to work and earn money this summer. One local business owner has some sound advice to help teens land that job. 7’s Lynn Martinez has more in today’s Parent to Parent.

WSVN — Robert Weinke says he was really anxious when he first applied for a summer job more than a year ago.

Robert Weinke: “I was nervous what he was going to ask me, about what was going to go down.”

Yet, the high school student pulled it together when he met the owner of John the Baker.

Robert Weinke: “I came in, I shook his hand, I said, “Hi, I’m Michelle’s Brother and I wonder if you had a job opening.”

John Scinicariello has been running the family restaurant for the past 18 years and he says teens need to realize confidence is key.

John Scinicariello: “You have to sell yourself first, you have to come in looking like you want to work.”

First, look presentable.

John Scinicariello: “Don’t come in chewing gum, wear clothes that fit, make sure you have a belt on and your pants aren’t half down your legs.”

Next, show some interest.

John Scinicariello: “When I get kids that come in and say my mom sent me to get a job, you haven’t got a chance to get hired.”

John says when you meet the boss or the person hiring, eye contact shows you are serious about working there.

John Scinicariello: “Look at the guy right in the eyes, and say, ‘I need a job and I’ll do whatever it takes to get one.'”

However, don’t list too many previous positions on the application. That can be a red flag for business owners.

John Scinicariello: “Don’t put 15 places down when you’re 16 years old in other words you can’t keep a job for 5 minutes?”

Robert proved he was willing to work hard by doing any task asked of him. Eventually he was upgraded to making the garlic rolls!

Robert Weinke: “They taught me how to do it. I learned quickly, made sure I worked hard and didn’t slack off.”

He also learned texting during working hours is not tolerated.

John Scinicariello: “Robert’s lost his phone so many times.”

Most importantly, Robert says his experience has taught him to be confident in any job he goes for in the future.

Robert Weinke: “You don’t want to be coming in here slouched going oh i want to work for you, be like i want to work for you!”

Lynn Martinez: John supports students working for him by being flexible with their school schedule and he insists they keep up their grades or they lose their job.

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